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20130801
20130831
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)
in many states, janitors, coaches, school workers. many will have to go part-time. aliforn, texas, michigan, iowa, they are cuttingarks and recreation and public workers. all health care driven. this is hat they are saying it is because of health reform. they are citing halth reform and dropping it because of part-time status. >> these folks are bus drivers and barely making it is it is. they have families and now they have to be cut to 30 hours with no benefits. it is really hurting the middle class and our country. what country are we living in? this is really bad. neil: let's go to richard benjamin. what do you think of this? early on the administration admits that it is surprise by the number of part-time workers that it hahelped to generate. but it is a fact. >> there are two critical numbers that we need to remember. 60% of personal bankruptcies were due to outrageous medical bills and someone who has a pre-existing condition, i identifieds one of two americans has a pre-existing condition. i am bankrupted or dead because of tt pre-existing condition, my paycheck moves. it i
, then when we were going through the courtroom drama with texas rangers and bankruptcy, people in courtroom made it clear, nobody wants you to have this team, so back off. neil: why? >> because i'm outspoken that is standing up for what you think is best for the -- >> absolutely, everyone is piling on alex rodriguez, you sort of said, i think paraphrasing, you know, we can go to eremes you said horrible referring to the way he was treated, it is disgrac disgraceh major lgue baseball is trying to do to him. they taken this too far. >> it is personal. rob thing i really like about david stern in nba we, league all owners said to him, would you like to have some discretionary funding, he said no. i want the decisions to be made by all of the ownersinings toge. you are the owners of this league, baseball is the opposite, there are stories of commissioner selig taking draft picks, and making draft picks mang unilateral decisions witht the owner. neil: what about that you don't go along with he action action yoalex rodriguezyou are banned ? >> i do not know that, he sene message. neil: is what is
to move to, looking at california, texas, all i know is that california is a mishmash of various taxes, excise fees, so many things. my accounts will be up 24 hours is trying to figure out. >> the strongest part of the u.s. economy in recent years has been a tight economy which has been based in large part in california. start-ups all the time. neil: a lot more in taxes. >> this idea that california is not cutting spending. they have draconian spending cuts under governor brown and it has raised taxes. and now have a balanced budget. this is a good example of what the federal government needs to do. neil: wait a minute. you're using california as an example? >> once upon a time before we had a strong republicans the way you balanced budgets was raised taxes and cut spending. neil: once upon a time before we have extreme liberals we had an openness to cutting taxes. >> kneele, i am just saying, look at the example of california that has a balanced budget and the example of washington, the federal government, which does not. neil: a junk debt state. >> california has more millionaires th
such a low unemployment rate in north dakota, texas, tennessee, kentucky? and high unemployment in illinois. look at who is governing and how, they do not dignify work, they dignify dependency. they want people dependant on government. neil: let's say, we were to hike wage to $15, people do not look at other side they look at mcdonald's, he earns a lot of money we know that franchisees, a razor-thin profit margin, that is where dollar would hit the room there is very little room for wiggle, if they could not pass along those costs, which few would accept, but, the reality is workers would have to go, right? >> absolutely, if you look at average volume, typical chin restaurant -- chain restaurant about $3 million, 25 year ago it was $900,000, they have the same number of workers today back then, today they serve 69 million customers a day. in back then it was 8 million, it is technology, the come. they -- equipment, they are have liesed people everywhere -- they have replaced people everywhere you look it will happen again, mchas about 13 newsestest in united states out of a million, averag
in the newspaper, the west texas interimmediate, but it's tied to oil in europe in recent years because we couldn't get our oil to the refinders. we had to import oil from places like the middle east and things. that's slightly changing. that relationship is changing. i think it's changing for the betterment i think we're starting to get to the point where if the price of oil goes up for a particular reason, we could have gasoline prics come back down, and that's going to be a nice disconnect for the consumers. neil: we hope that happens, but reality is oftentimes it does not breeding cynicism that there is a ball. is this about americans who don't quite buy what you said? >> i hear that all the time. gasoline prices are up, saying, hey, every time prices go up, it's like crazy and takes forever to come down. they are right. it usually happens, but what they don't realize is that more often than not when prices take off like a rocket, you know, the retailers and wholesalers can barely keep up with raising the prices, and more than not, when you see a sharp spike in oil and goose lean, the margins
words of warning by the way. katrina pierson in dallas, texas. >>> when empty-nesters that sign the economy is running on empty? [ horn honks ] [ male announcer ] once in a ile, everything falls into perfect harmony. [ engine revs ] and you find yourself in exactly the right place atthe right time. just be sure you're in the right car when it happens. the 201c-class sports sedan. power, performance, and style in total alignment. neil: well you know, more adu kids than ever are refusing to leave the nest. they're making it their nest and increang their nest for life because more than one out of three young people are still living with mom-a-pop. some not so young. up to 31 years of age. that is a lot of normans in the basement. a sign this economy is going psycho? ask jo ling kent and steve lazear and jean marsh. what do you think? >> a lot of factors, confluence of things. rising education costs. really difficult employment situation. parents who are willing to have their kids live at home. kids willing to live with their parents. this up tick has gone from 32 to 36 i find all t
pierson in dallas, texas. >>> when empty-nesters that sign the economy is running on empty? neil: well you know, more adult kids than ever are refusing to leave the nest. they're making it their nest and increasing their nest for life because more than one out of three young people are still living with mom-and-pop. some not so young. up to 31 years of age. that is a lot of normans in the basement. a sign this economy is going psycho? ask jo ling kent and steve lazear and jean marsh. what do you think? >> a lot of factors, confluence of things. rising education costs. really difficult employment situation. parents who are willing to have their kids live at home. kids willing to live with their parents. this up tick has gone from 32 to 36%. i find all this interesting this is coming together and more and more people are living at home. something, when i graduated from college i ran far away to china. but, it's something that has become -- neil: taking a bit of a leap there. i told my daughters the poconos would be a start. >> it is becoming very socially acceptable. think there is something
Search Results 0 to 23 of about 24 (some duplicates have been removed)